Aug 24
Camp with my tent

PCTA Work Party Sasquatch Volunteer Vacation-Goat Rocks 16-23AUG

I had signed up for this trip early in the year, having hiked the area we would be working on in the recent past.  I enjoy doing trail work, and it is quite educational to experience how much work it really takes to maintain a trail in the wilderness. Though I had expressed a desire to hike the PCT in 2019, this had little influence on me wanting to actually contribute to the maintenance of this trail. 

I arrived to the starting trailhead at Waptus Lake the evening before on 16AUG, and some of the fellow participants were already there. I had a great night’s sleep, and the next morning, was able to meet the entire crew for our endeavor. The leaders, Justin and Dave, explained the rules of engagement, we did some stretching exercises, and off we went to a campsite (as seen above), 4.5 miles up the Waptus Lake trail. It was an easy hike, even with our packs loaded heavier than usual, and with a short steep uphill climb. The food, tools, and other provisions were being brought in by horse and mule through the agency of horse riding volunteers. The horse team passed us on the way into camp. 

We helped set up the community cooking tent, then hiked about ½ to 1 mile further to assess the trail segment on which we would be working. On return to camp, we set up our personal tents, and then had dinner, cooked compliments of Justin and Dave. Each night, two of the crew were assigned to do the cooking and kitchen clean-up. Even with our help, Justin and Dave had to do the lion’s share of coordinating the food efforts, and putting out the food for each day’s breakfast and lunch. 

On day 2, we commenced operations. I was involved in a team that did brushing on the trail below (south of) the Waptus Lake trail junction. The remainder of the crew went north on the PCT and started cutting down cedar trees, debarking the trunks, and installing check steps along the trail. Various portions of the trail would form large “ruts” from rain run-off, but drainage channels and check steps helped to slow the process of erosion of the trail. In the following days, I performed a combination of more brushing, installing check steps, de-berming (removing the outside edge of the trail in order to allow water run-off), and de-sloughing (removing the build-up of slough from the inside edge of the trail acquired my material coming downhill onto the trail). Perhaps Justin and Dave grew a little weary of my constant inquiry as to what and why we were doing things, but little did they know that I had a nickname as a kid of “twenty questions”. 

The very last day, we worked on the trail for only a few hours, adding polish to our work. We had installed 21 Steps (sounds like a Hitchcock film!!!), and did a massive amount of brushing, and de-berming/de-sloughing/drainage structures of the trail. It was a satisfying experience.

I really enjoy all the people that I get to meet in the work party. I felt like the  old goat (Alter Knacker) or (Blöde Ziege) of the group, though I believe there were 1-2 people older than me. There was Jacob, a sixteen year old kid, hoping to thru-hike the PCT next year. Beverly was a wonderful resource and a joy to work with, who had done many work parties in the Olympics. Joan was a very pleasant spirit, who shared a common occupation in the medical field. Julian, of whom I accidentally called “Marcel”. (Unfortunately???), the name seemed to stick, had hiked the PCT four years ago as “Back-scratcher”, and was most helpful in offering pointers in strategies of doing the PCT. Evan was delightful, a person I wish I could have spent more time with. Then there was Sterling, a gregarious personality who hails from North Carolina, who had an affection for finding the Sasquatch, and with whom I had many delightful interchanges. Sadly, his knee began acting up during our week of work. I hope that the knee is an easy to fix. Lastly (but not least), I mention Anne. She hails from Ingolstadt (in Bavaria, Germany), and was a true delight to get to know. I admire her willingness to come to America to get dirty working on our trails. It really touched my heart. She also was a doctor, and I felt a strong kindred spirit with her. I truly hope that we might meet again. . . vielleicht in mein Heimatland, Deutschland. Ich ehrlich liebe Deutschland!!!!! 

I left our fearless leaders last, but only because they deserve special mention. They made an awesome team, and set a tone within the work party that helped everybody on the team have a great time.  Justin was our fearless leader. He walked with a sprightly stride, and radiated the joie de vivre. Particularly, Justin was able to maintain qualities of a leader, such as not forming favorites within the group, and spent time interacting with each and every of the work party members. He behaved like he truly enjoyed what he was doing, which was infectious among the worker bees. Dave was a thru-hiker veteran, trail named Spatula, a bit more quiet personality, but also manifesting excellent leader skills. I loved interacting with Dave.

Several items need to be mentioned. The weather was perfect, but forest fires in the Northwest caused much haziness in the atmosphere, and leading to blood-red moons every night. The dew was quite heavy each morning. Besides my trips with a gourmet chef (John Pribyl), I have never eaten so well on a backpack trip. Superb planning by Dave and the assistance of the horse team allowed that to happen. Finally, my shoes died. I was personally attached to those shoes! They were the first shoes I had ever hiked in with which I had not gotten a blister after a multi-day hike. They took me around Rainier twice on the Wonderland Trail, and many, many other places. I had quit using them for hiking in the last few years, going to Alta shoes (light-weight hiking shoes), but needed them for WTA work parties. Thankfully, I had already purchased an exact second pair, fearing that they would some day die. They died. I noticed that the soles were coming off of both shoes the first day in. Several days later, I took precautionary measures by duct-taping the soles in a circumferential fashion to the boots. That partially helped, but by the time of the hike out, the soles were barely attached to the upper portion of the shoe. The padding of the shoe entirely decomposed, offering no cushion to the terra firma. I acquired my first (but small, non-painful) blister in many years. The shoes were in such pitiful condition, that I threw them away at the tail-head.

In the drive home, I had to make a stop at Scale Burgers in Elbe. Cora, the owner, was my cancer patient many moons ago, and over 25 years later, remained free of cancer. She came out to have a long chat with me. It’s hard to believe that Cora is in her mid-eighties and still kicking strong. The hamburger was also quite awesome. 

As I finish writing this post, I finish the last of five “Tristan und Isolde”s that I have serially listened to. The opera ends with the Liebestod, an extremely demanding soprano solo forced on poor Isolde at the end of five hours of intense singing. I mention this, in that the opera ends sadly, but the trail work also has a sad ending, in that good-bye’s need to be said, and a new set of circumstances need to be engaged. Many are returning back to work. Justin and Dave, after a week of rest, must prepare for yet another work party in the Mt. Adams area, and I must seriously make a decision about whether I should thru-hike the PCT next year. My leaning is in the strong affirmative, though I hate the thought of leaving my wife for 5-6 months, and staying dirty for that length of time. I’m used to sterile operating suites that had no hint of dust. I fear river crossings. But, I love God’s great earth, and share with Bilbo and Frodo the reluctant joy of an epic adventure. 

The cooking tent
A hazy sky from forest fires
Geriatric boots, ready to die
Some of the 21 Check steps that we installed
God’s beautiful world, created for our delight
Looking down from the PCT on the lake by which we were camped
The camp. Sterling rests his knee.
Beverly and Jacob take pride in a proto-typical check step
Joan shows off a step check in creation
Horses and mules saved our backs
We are most grateful to the horsemen that ferried our supplies to and from camp
Adios, my beloved boots

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Aug 09

Dewey Lake with Sam

I had planned on hiking into Snow Lake MORA (Mount Rainier) with Sam, purchased the reservations, and then at the last minute realized that I had the dates wrong. Panic and planning led to a longer hike (3.1 miles rather than 1.4 miles), but I’m glad we did it. Sam had an awesome time. He led the hike both ways, and kept a reasonable rate without any complaining. At the lake, I set up camp, did some swimming, loafed (I brought along an ultra-light camp chair), and did the cooking. Sam’s appetite was voracious. Here are some photos…

At the start, Sam is quite fresh

Sam at an overlook to Dewey Lake, half way in. It is about 800 feet down.

An eager backpacker

Sam had a voracious appetite, and ate almost all the food I brought in.

Sam, chilling out at the lake.

The amount of bugs were moderate, and Sam counted 14 bug bites. I had about the same. Our only mishap was that Sam realized at camp that he forgot to pack the sleeping bag. Ooops! We made do by opening my sleeping bag and using it as a quilt. We did not use the fly to our tent, and the stars were most beautiful. With the hike out, Sam did a wonderful pace, even though the climb made him a bit tired. He didn’t feel like he could do another mile. Because the hike was entirely on the PCT, several thru-hikers piqued Sam’s interest, though Sam adamantly remarked that he would not take off five months to do the PCT if that meant skipping school. Oh well… we’ll see!

 

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Jul 27

Northern Loop of Mount Rainier 23-25JUL 2018

I had signed up for the Northern Loop on Mount Rainier in April, as it was one of the few hikes remaining on my list to do in Mount Rainier NP in order to complete all of the major hikes in the park. Besides, I was quite curious about the northern aspect of the park, which is somewhat less accessible than most other areas of the park. The year was mostly spent bicycling, and so to get my hiking legs in shape, I focused on some peaks in the Snoqualmie/North Bend area, doing Mailbox Peak, Mt. Si, and Rattlesnake Ridge. Mailbox Peak was definitely the hardest and Rattlesnake the easiest, but all are demanding climbs.

Russ A. with me on the summit of Mailbox Peak. Guess why it is called “Mailbox” Peak?

I have never done the summit scramble on Mt. Si, but always stop at the overlook several 100 feet below the true summit.

The summit of Rattlesnake Ridge does not afford any views

I had planned to do the hike with Russ A., but various circumstances prevented that from happening, so, not being able to find another hiking partner on short notice, I set out solo. Because the Carbon River Road inside the park is washed out with no intention of the NP service to repair it, an extra 5 miles is added to the hike, which is not challenging, since it is basically flat, with easy gravel road conditions. I camped at the Ipsut Creek campground that night.

Ipsut Creek Camp

Views of the mountains from the Carbon River Road

Waking up the next morning, I headed out, knowing that this would be the hardest day, entailing over 4000 ft of climbing in the space of about 4 miles. The weather could not be more perfect, and I headed across the Carbon River, then working up Chenuis Mountain to the Yellowstone Cliffs. It actually went easier than I thought, though it was a steady climb all of the way through, without relief. Fortunately, it was in dense forest, which kept the hike cool. The Yellowstone Cliffs were most spectacular, and the beauty even intensifying as one reached the Windy Gap, where several alpine lakes, still with some surrounding snow and snow-clad mountains, contributed to the scenic ambience.

Yellowstone Cliffs

Yellowstone Cliffs

Windy Gap View

Windy Gap flowered meadows

Top of Windy Gap looking eastward

Natural Bridge. Below, Lake James is to the right and Lake Ethyl to the left.

Yes, I also did the side trip to see Natural Bridge, which was cool, but a bit of a grunt to get to. Descending about 1300 ft, I arrived at Lake James camp. After setting the tent up and having my celebratory brandy and cigar, I realized that the flies and mosquitos were to intense to enjoy a cooked meal, so settled for a Snicker bar and granola bars. It worked.

Lake James camp

Lake James

The next morning was more descent, about 1400 ft more, to the west fork of the White River. The trail passed by a small burn area before reaching the river.

Burn area, down from Lake James

Upon reaching the White River, I saw rock cairns where the park service suggested doing a crossing of the river. It appeared very unsafe to pass and so I spent about an hour going up and down stream, looking for more safe areas to cross. The particularly warm weather tended to fill the stream and the water was both deep and very rapid moving. I know that others had been able to cross, but being alone and unsure about the crossing decided not to take my chances. On returning from the hike, I checked out other WTA trip reports, and noted that the crossing in the past week was described as perilously risky, or the “most frightening experience”, which to me means it should not have been crossed by those people. I won’t be surprised if I hear of an accident or death of somebody attempting to cross the river there. The park service really needs to offer a substantive warning to those attempting the Northern Loop. I decided to head back. It was a 2.2 mile descent from Lake James to the West Fork of the White River, so I calculated about 18 miles to hike out. I had completed about half of the loop, and except for a couple miles, had hiked the rest of the loop at various times before, so considered my trip a success. I was a bit tired and sore on reaching the car, and my 27 lb pack felt like it had just doubled its weight, causing me to re-weigh it when I got home to confirm that the boogie man did not sneak some stones in my pack on the hike out.

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Jun 04

Bike Travel Weekend 2018

The first weekend in June is bike travel weekend, and I had signed up many moons ago to do this. Originally, I thought that I’d still be on the TransAm, but my TransAm sorrows are already well documented in other blog pages on this site. I won’t resurrect a sad episode(s) in my life journeys on a bike. This current ride is one I’ve thought about many times, but not being completely informed as to the nature of the road, figured that an adventure would best reveal what was up. Originally, I wanted to do a ride out of Eugene, OR, traversing the Aufderheide Drive, but I discovered that a portion of the road was closed due a landslide, so a potential disappointment was avoided. For this ride, I was quite sure that three days would be necessary to complete the ride, having a fear that I had lost some of my mojo, and wishing to go lazy. Well, I did go lazy, but other factors were a problem. The weather was beautiful, and the natives were out in droves. Every campsite, or even, possible campsite, were occupied. It would have been easiest to do this during the week, but then I would have missed the “official” bike travel weekend.

I started my journey from Lew and Carol’s house in Happy Valley, OR. Lew is my brother a year older than me. I wished to bypass Estacada by going on backroads from Carver past McIver Park on Springwater Road. Interestingly, I had ridden this as a cycle tour in the early 1970’s with a friend, Ron Hansen. We had no clue what we were doing, and on discovering (at that time) that no overnight camping was allowed in McIver Park, stealth camped in some dude’s front yard a bit down the road from the Park. The next day, we got up to the dam on the Clackamas River, and realized that we were too exhausted to go on. After all, we were overpacked, and not knowing about panniers, were wearing traditional 1970’s framed backpacks. It was not too cool. Contrariwise, this current adventure had all the amenities of current technology, and travel was a joy. Already I could see the mountain (Mt. Hood) in the background.

Leaving Lew and Carol’s

Mt. Hood from Springwater Road.

I continued to ride up the Clackamas River road, discovering what a joy it was, with wide shoulders, courteous drivers, and tons of cyclists, most being road bikers, out for a beautiful day. As a kid, we used to frequently go rafting down the Clackamas, and I didn’t recall any of the rapids, but noted that many expedition guides were out conducting this clients down the river. It was a bit different in the 1970’s, when we would use smaller rafts, expecting to be flipped in the most challenging rapids, yet never wearing life vests. It’s surprising that we survived.

Very nice road shoulders on a beautiful river.

Rapids on the Clackamas River.

Ripplebrook Store and Ranger station

I arrived at Ripplebrook at noon, wasn’t tired, and wasn’t ready to give up for the day, so opted to start up the road to Timothy Lake. It was a beautiful forest road. Nearing Timothy Lake, I discovered that some of the road was NOT paved. There were 7 miles of gravel road, minus ½ mile several miles in that were paved. Regardless of that, there wasn’t a lot of loose gravel, which made travel fairly easy, even though it was steadily a 3-6% uphill grade. Sixteen miles out of Ripplebrook, I finally arrived at Timothy Lake, an artificial lake created by Portland General Electric.

The dam is currently being rebuilt

My tent and bike at Gone Creek campground

Timothy Lake, with Mount Hood rising up in the background. Lots of boats were out on the lake.

I arrived at Timothy Lake at about 4 pm. There are 4 campgrounds circling the south portion of the lake, and like the last time I tried camping at Timothy Lake, the campgrounds were totally full. Like last time, I needed to beg somebody to let me mooch off of their campsite and take a small portion to set up my tent. You can see the tent of my gracious host behind my tent. I could have gone 2 miles further to a horse camp frequently utilized by PCT hikers, but it still ruffled my dander that these campsites do not provide hiker/biker sites. The horse camp did not have a supply of water, which I desperately needed. Oddly, the “drinking water” of the campground had a cloudy white appearance, and so I still used my water filter to clean up the drinking water.

I slept well, and woke up at 5:20 the next morning with nearly cloudless skies. I was on the road to a very chilly morning by 6:20, knowing that I had some serious climbing ahead of me, and thinking that I might make it to Zigzag with some effort. Highway 26 out of Timothy Lake has a pass to go over, that is actually slightly higher in altitude than Government Camp. There is a significant drop, before you start climbing again up to Government Camp. After Government Camp, it is mostly downhill, with just one climb of about 2 miles of 6% grade as one nears Sandy, OR. I arrived in Zigzag by 9:30 in the morning, much earlier than I anticipated, and then Sandy, OR at 11 am. Stopping in Sandy for lunch, I then arrived at Lew and Carol’s house before 1 pm, passing through Boring and Damascus.

Blue Box Pass

Government Camp

The road out of Government Camp, with wide, ample shoulders for bikes.

So, what have I learned on this trip.

  1. Go light!!!! Reconsider everything that is packed for necessity.
  2. You haven’t lost your mojo… but, be real when you plan your adventures.
  3. I’d love to return to this area. It is VERY favorable for cyclists.
  4. I need to discover better ways to combine hiking and biking. This will possibly include day trips on foot, so need to bring actual hiking shoes. On thishis trip, I brought my Walmart special sandals for camp, but which are horrid to walk with around the camp.
  5. I’m ready for another adventure!!!!! I haven’t had soreness or discomfort as was so typical in the past after long ventures.
  6. I’m always ready for others to join me. It just is more fun with somebody else. Sign up!
  7. I really, really, really love the Northwest. The only other places that tempt me is western Canada/Alaska, and Idaho, Montana, Colorado. I might also be tempted with Cafilornia, like riding the Pacific Coast/Sierra Cascades loop.
  8. I still love backpacking. I have a number of backpack trips on the works this year, a few with either Jon (son) or Russ (friend) or…. YOU!!!!!

ps, remember, you can click on the photos for a full view.

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May 26

The last post left you dangling. The photos remained much too large, even though I went to extreme measures to try to reduce their size. What is a simple chore on my iMac is a nightmare on my iPad. Brother Dennis suggested a Microsoft product, which doesn’t work on an iPad. I have come to believe that Apple, or perhaps WordPress, expects all photos to be taken by an iPhone. I could not think of a more disgusting proposition. The turmoil of trying to be a competent bloggist with incompetent software rankles my gizzard, to say the least. At home, I was able to correct the image size on my iMac, so you can review the previous post with real images. All the images are clickable, and will either enlarge or shrink to become viewable on this post.

18-21MAY—But, now, on with the story of our adventure. We left off in Dillon/Silverthorne, planning the continuation of our adventure, reconciling my brother’s desire to camp in remote but free locations, and my desire to ride a bicycle, caring the least whether the night was spent in a tent rather than a hotel room. I had my tent and sleeping bag, so either approach to sunset to sunrise made no difference to me, as the journey was the most important. We opted for driving to a campsite, located along the TransAm route, and that I would start riding again in a day or two. Several state campgrounds were located on a reservoir north of Silverthorne, and off we went. We knew that the campgrounds would be open on the 18th, but we didn’t calculate into our plans what time they would open on the 18th. Our first, second, and third state park campsites were all locked shut. Finally, on the fourth campsite, we found some poor codger with his massive RV trailer waiting to be let in, claiming that he had been waiting for two days, but that he was assured that in 4 hours the gates should be opened wide for all to enter. We could not take it anymore, and sought the campground registries for a campsite that would suit us and also assuredly be open. We ended up at Stagecoach Lake, an artificial reservoir just south of Steamboat Springs. Much to both of our chagrin’s, the site was infested with RVs. We found a somewhat quiet spot in one of the higher camps off of the lake. I slept with Gaylon in his tent, a premium 4-man Walmart special. It worked ok for the first night. We decided to stay a second night, in order to do some hiking around the lake, which was duly accomplished. That evening, the daily thunderstorm decided to dump more than the usual amount of rain on us, and most of the rain was half frozen. Gaylon enjoyed the affair while sitting in his car. I suffered through the event inside the tent. Rain leaked in everywhere, and the bathtub floor was most effective at serving as a bathtub to hold the water in. Though most of my stuff in the tent got soaked, by miraculous intervention from the Almighty, my sleeping bag stayed mostly dry, partially by me keeping elevated on my air mattress, and partially by me putting my fleece coat over the sleeping bag to keep the spray of rain from soaking the bag. The squall ended soon enough, but by then, Gaylon had learned that inclement weather and more snow were due along our path in Wyoming in the subsequent week. I had learned that many of the campsites would still not be open. I was STILL WAY TOO EARLY!!!!!!!!! Gaylon desperately wanted warmer weather, as we woke up with all of our stuff outside now frozen in ice after being coated in rain. Compromise and negotiation led to pushing another abort button. We loaded everything up, hopped in the car, and headed out I-70 to Provo, Utah. Our intention is to hit the beaches of northern Cafilornia (not a spelling error!) and do some beach camping. When we get back, I’d then strain my brain for more adventures.

Campsite in Colorado, with the Walmart special 4 man tent. Gaylon loves to start campfires, which he did every night.

Stagecoach reservoir.

22MAY- today, the drive was through Utah and Nevada on I-80, ending in Carson City. Uneventful, but we drove a short distance on the loneliest road, which looked very appealing for bicycles, a possibility early some Spring.

23MAY- Cafilornia! The drive up to South Lake Tahoe was beautiful, and the descent to Sacramento was stunning. The road was VERY busy with no shoulders, explaining why the ACA Western Express route avoids this pass. We experienced price shock as the price of gasoline went up by a dollar to over $4/gallon. We hit the beach at Bodega Bay, and kept our eyes open for birds. The drive up highway 1 was treacherous. There were many bicyclists, most on road bikes, but a few with touring bikes. Highway 1 also was very busy, with no shoulders. I’m surprised more cyclists are not killed on this road. We finally found a camp at Van Damme state park, just south of Mendocino. It was probably one of the worst campsites we stayed at, but worst was the sticker shock… $45/night!!!! It made me totally hate Cafilornia.

This is for brother Dennis. We noticed a Bilderberger conspiracy company masquerading as a hamburger stop.

Van Damme camp. The most expensive camping night that I’ve ever done.

24MAY- Oregon! On reaching Oregon, the roads became VERY bicycle friendly. The remainder of Highway 1, and 101 were very busy, and very bicycle adverse. I notice that the ACA Pacific Coast bicycle route frequently attempts to get off of 101, and for understandable reasons. Oregon was just as beautiful, but sooooo bicycle friendly. If I ever do the Pacific Coast Bicycle Route, I’ll be tempted to just skip Northern California. Our drive took us to Florence, and we stayed in Honeyman state park just south of Florence, but after having dinner at Mo’s. What an awesome seafood restaurant! The campsite was not expensive, and we absolutely loved it, especially after our Cafilornia experience.

Honeyman State Park. It was so nice, Gaylon was tempted to spend another night there.

25MAY- Gaylon was now eager to get home. We headed over to I-5 via Eugene, Oregon, stopped at Bike Friday to check on the bicycle I ordered from them, and then headed back to Puyallup. It was bittersweet arriving home. I love to see Betsy, but there were thoughts of regret. Should I have parted ways with Gaylon and simply continued the TransAm? He had absolutely NO interest in going any further north, though he would have should I have insisted in my pursuit. I’m not sure it would have been proper to treat my brother like that. So, multiple thoughts run through my mind in planning new ventures.

  1. Epic ventures (really long trips) should be done with somebody accompanying. Unfortunately, not too many of my friends ride, and the ones that do are NOT interested in epic ventures. I would consider doing the TransAm van supported on my road bike with the ACA, though the only thing deterrent is that I hate to cook when camping, especially for other people. Perhaps I should look for other companies that do rides across America?
  2. There is no doubt that I love the Northwest more than any other place around. I have yet to explore the northwest as well as I’d like. I am currently planning at least two bicycle tours this summer of 4-14 days length this year. One is a loop that crosses east over White Pass, and then comes back over the North Cascades highway. The other is to take the train down to Eugene, OR and ride a loop of the Aufderheide. Anybody want to go with me?
  3. I have a number of backpack trips scheduled already this year, several with the WTA on volunteer trail maintenance activities, and two are in Mount Rainier National Park, one with Russ doing the northern loop, and one with Betsy, backpacking in to Snow Lake.
  4. My failures with the TransAm were never due to physical inability, as I always ended feeling great after long hard climbs. Weather was my worst enemy, and desire to be riding with somebody my second worst enemy. Strategic issues were a problem, as parks generally don’t open until Memorial Day or later, and I prefer earlier rides, so that I could miss hot weather, which kills me. It suggests that maybe the southern tier in spring would be a better option for me that the TransAm.
  5. Weight is a vital issue. I still way overpack. I will be working feverishly on coming up with lighter solutions. Many people plan on staying in hotels through their trip, which I don’t want to do.
  6. I am left wondering about what I am going to do regarding backpacking the PCT next year. It has its appeal, yet there are several thoughts on my mind…
    1. I certainly won’t be alone, as 50 people a day will be starting the trail. It is not a social trail like the Appalachian Trail, but it is also not a lonesome trek, like hiking across Alaska.
    2. It is still an epic venture, which I wonder if I’m psychologically prepared to do.
    3. Physical issues become a more serious concern here, which I don’t have when cycling. I do not have the balance that I used to have. Crossing streams is indubitably my overwhelming greatest fear. I’ve never done more than 25 miles with a pack on my back in a day. I detest super-hot weather, like when one traverses the Mojave desert. Yet, other less physically capable people are able to do the trail, so I should also be able to.
    4. I need to sign up on November 1st in order to get a permit to hike the length of the trail. I will be doing a moderate amount of backpacking this summer, and so should be able to assess whether I’m up to the task by 01NOV.
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