Dec 23

How Britain Initiated Both World Wars, by Nick Kollerstrom ★★★★

First, I’d like to discuss why I chose to read this book and to mention why it received 4 and not 3 or 5 stars from me. The topic of responsibility for the two world wars in Europe is to most Europeans and Americans quite obvious—it was the Germans. Sadly, this commonly known “fact” is almost certainly not true. It takes much gall to go against the prevailing opinions of the elite, as Nick Kollerstrom discovered in writing this book. My interest in war responsibility started after reading Pat Buchanan’s book, Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War. In this text, Buchanan bucks the notion that Hitler was an evil maniac desiring the conquest of the world. Odd that the person who most promoted the notion of the Hitler image, Winston Churchill, was an evil maniac that controlled an empire ruling 1/4 of the surface of world. The British had discovered the usefulness of war propaganda long before Himmler ever used it to his advantage. Churchill had to paint the Germans as desperate immoral mongrels raping women, slaughtering children, and kicking innocent dogs. This is strange, since Churchill’s beloved Queen (Victoria) was the grandmother to Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany who was currently head of state of Germany. It is no surprise that the embarrassed British had to quietly change the name of their King from a German-sounding name of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor. People have written many volumes detailing the deception, crimes and ineptitude of the “ruling elite” in government: even my own brother Dennis has produced a book of this sort many moons ago, titled “What is Going On?” (or something like that). I would not have drawn the same conclusions as Dennis, yet agree that there is a “deep state” that gives democracy an illusion of populace control of the state, when actually the ideology, thoughts, and decisions of the public are expertly manipulated by very few people, and decisions made and kept secret from the population. Have we not seen that in our recent impeachment hearings and the uncovering of deep moral vacuousness in the FBI and other state institutions? I’m not surprised. Dennis lacks by being too kind to the depth of depravity transpiring in the unseen world of world politics. A number of recent books have come out, and there are now YouTube videos that have taken Buchanan’s book and run with it. See the Horus YouTube site, for instance. I’ll be reading yet 1-2 more books after this also on the causation of the two world wars. This book was good in offering detailed accounts of the subterfuge and deception of Churchill and Grey exercised in desperately trying to get a war with Germany (in 1914) while the British parliament was deeply opposed to the idea. The basic idea was that Britain was never honest in its diplomacy with Germany which led to misunderstandings that resulted in the tragedy of WWI.

The book is an assemblage of four papers that Kollerstrom wrote that form the four chapters. The typesetting and book organization is horrid. The call-outs are just lengthy repetitions of the text and serve no useful purpose. Statements are multiply repeated both within chapters and between chapters. Kollerstrom fails to sufficiently develop the England-causality idea sufficient to be completely credible. Other than that, the book offers some intriguing insights, some of which I will discuss.

Chapter 1, How Britain initiated both world wars, is the lengthiest and takes up over 1/2 of the book. Starting with WWI, the author brings up multiple statements and news clippings from the pre-war years showing how Kaiser Wilhelm (II) was a man of peace. Germany had not been at war for 50 years, while Britain remained in a constant state of war over those years, and France engaged in other wars. Diplomacy failures and horrible treaties all resulted in the ensuing carnage of the Great War. The treaty of Germany with Austria, and France with Russia forced very unwilling hands to act. Secretive but later uncovered defense treaties between France and England escalated what could have been a limited conflict, when everybody would have realized the illogical nature of the battle. Fueling the turn of the war from a few defensive skirmishes and attempts to assure a position of safety, Churchill and Grey were most masterful at creating a war that the politicians (of both England and Germany) did not want, and that the people of England were soon to regret. Untruthful propaganda by Britain’s war department still prevails in western thinking even when it has been shown to be nothing but malignant lies about the German people.

World war II is really a continuation of WWI, since the treaty of Versailles was patently unfair in both the assumptions (war responsibility 100% Germany’s) and the “punishment” to Germany. It is no wonder that Germany behaved like a wounded lion, ready to settle the account. Yet, history doesn’t show that at all. The Versailles’ decision to divide Germany up into many pieces and allot those pieces to Poland, Czechoslovakia (a horrible mistake), resulted in lands that were almost entirely of ethnic German peoples now serving under other nationalities. It is not that these nationalities, especially Poland, were benevolent and impartial governors. Tabled from view were the atrocities that German people received from their new Polish rulers, which explains the mass migration westward of Germans that occurred in the 1920’s. The west noted that this simply was a lie that Hitler created to justify his actions. There is no doubt that Hitler created lies, but this was not one of them. Above all, Hitler made it abundantly clear that he did not wish for a war with Britain or France. They forced his hand. Multiple quotes from many of Hitler’s writings (even Mein Kampf) and speeches noted Hitler’s desire to remain peaceful with Great Britain. Churchill would have none of that. Churchill wanted war. And, Churchill got war. It is surprising that the west has the naïveté to regard Churchill as a great statesman and hero of the west.

Chapter 2, On the avoidability of WWI, mostly reiterates what is found in chapter 1. Chapter 3, Britain as pioneer of city bombing, demonstrates yet another propaganda lie that Churchill has shoved on the British people. We are taught that the British bombed to smithereens every Germany city because the Germans started it all by bombing London. Actually, the opposite is true. Germany had no interest in going to war with Britain, and had no long-range bombers to accomplish that. Meanwhile Britain was building a huge long-range bomber force with anticipation that they would someday bomb Germany. History clearly records Britain bombing civilian centers in Hamburg and Duisberg and Berlin months before the first aerial bombing of London by the Germans. Precisely, Hamberg was bombed on May 11, the day after Churchill became chancellor, and the first German bombing was on September 6 of 1940. This was in spite of clearly stated British declarations of war morality noting that civilian bombing was completely off-limits. Hohum. I presume that one’s moral statements and one’s actions don’t need to coincide. Worse yet, in spite of having declared the immorality of civilian bombing, the Brits were bombing civilian populations in India and Asia years before, in the early 1930’s. Oh wait, I forgot, Indians and Asians and Germans are not human, so guess it doesn’t matter.

Chapter 4, will of the warmongers, provides additional historical material regarding events leading up to WWII that destroys the notion that Hitler was an insane maniac desirous of ruling the world. Victors write the history books, but fortunately, enough history is still existent that we are able to question the forced narrative of the past to ask what really happened to start WWI and II. Truth be told, we all stand guilty. My only regret is that history still offers Churchill a “saint” status. He was a chain-smoking besotted drunk womanizer thirsty for war and willing to destroy nations to accomplish his blood-thirsty lust for power.

People often attribute my stance on Churchill and German as representing me as a Hitler lover or pro-German-regardless-of-the-truth subscriber. Neither is true. I might be of German heritage, but I am American. I do care about the truth, and when facts are given that are inconsistent, then I question the facts. The prevailing narratives of WWI & II are such situations. Therefore, whether or not you tend to accept the prevailing explanation as to why the great world wars occurred, I suggest that you challenge those thoughts momentarily and ask as to the veracity of those explanations. I believe that you may not like what you find. I offered only the briefest details of what was spoken of. You might have many questions as to the veracity of this book since it’s not what you were taught in school, yet the documentation comes mostly from easily available sources as so remain credible. I don’t recommend this book as a starting book on the topic. Watch some the Horus YouTube videos on Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War, or better yet, read Pat Buchanan’s book for yourself and discover a replacement narrative that is truer than the one you’ve been taught.

Tagged with:
3 Comments »
Dec 21

It is hard to believe that this year is already over. I remember the anticipation and anxiety at the beginning of this year, looking forward to a possibly complete hike of the PCT. I had my reservation and had spent several years researching the project and planning out all of the details. Much effort was applied to the assembly of 22 resupply boxes that I would need. My equipment was reviewed multiple times in hopes of making my pack lighter, and the equipment to be carried was to be as efficient as possible. The trail maps were reviewed, and my imagination formed the basis of my conception of what the trail might be like (my conception was wrong). Even in late 2018, I was running up hills with a fully loaded pack, and wondering how it would actually be when I was on the trail. I had contacted Huguenot Heritage for possibly turning the hike into a hike-a-thon. I took a very wintery trip out to Moscow, Idaho where Huguenot Heritage is based to discuss plans and accomplish filming.

Even with all the training hikes and planning for the PCT, I also sought to write an autobiography. Over Christmas 2018 I had composed most of the autobiography in my head, and simply needed to write it down and include photographs. There were a few mysteries from my past that I needed to resolve, and was able to successfully accomplish that over the ensuing months before my hike began.

Betsy and I also were busy entertaining our dear friend Phil Mueller who passed away in July. Betsy and I had a heart for him, as he was a highly atypical person. Phil spent time in prison for entrepreneurship in the recreational pharmaceutical market. Prison helped him get over the drug habit and to start taking seriously his Christian faith. He became a very outspoken Christian, but still had some highly unusual quirks, the most important was him being completely oblivious to any form of social correctness when speaking on racial issues or political issues. We look forward to reconnecting with Phil in heaven and still have an empty spot in our hearts for him. One of my favorite physicians, Dr. Werner Peters, an anesthesiologist that I had worked with many times, had a major stroke a year ago, leaving him with profound right hemiplegia. After two years, he is slowly recovering and able to walk, but Betsy and I both have a desire to give him attention and provide help and assistance for him as needed. We’ve been able to do many meals together, and with him being a Thai food addict, it’s been easy to enjoy many meals with him. At Thanksgiving, we’ve finally been able to get him over to our house for a good meal and the entire family enjoyed his presence.

I ultimately accomplished a little more than 1000 miles of the PCT. This venture is chronicled nicely on my blog page and so I will not repeat it. I started at the Mexican border and was able to hike the entire desert section of the trail up to Walker Pass, and then hiked sections in northern California, Southern and northern Oregon, and central Washington. I was ultimately rejected from the trail by a number of factors, the most important being record levels of snow, mosquitos, personal injury (anterior tibial stress syndrome and neck issues), as well as personal issues. I started and stopped 5 times, which led to moderate discouragement. In the end, Betsy and I went to Hart’s Pass (30 miles from the Canadian border) in early September to play trail angels. This was a total hoot and we might do it again next year with a trail angel we met at Hart’s Pass, E.Z. The first break in the PCT hike was at Tehachapi, where I came home to recover from a severe case of anterior tibial stress syndrome (extreme pain in the muscles of the anterior right leg), but also to attend the graduation of our daughter Diane, who achieved a Ph.D. as a nurse practitioner.

In February, I started receiving social security checks, and in August was started on MediCare. I don’t feel old enough, even though the parts (of the body) seem to be giving out slowly. Betsy and I were able to host three people that I met on the trail and needed a place to stay before returning to the trail or to home. These were Alicia (Sailor), Intrepid, and the Flying Dutchman (Michael). All were wonderful people and a total delight to help them in their journey.

In mid-August, while driving home from a training hike on Mt. Peak, my car was rear-ended. It totaled our 10 yo Toyota Tacoma. This meant purchasing a new car, and Betsy and I decided on another Toyota Tacoma, but this time a 4 wheel drive off-road vehicle. We put a canopy on the back and immediately fell in love with it.

In late September, I did my last hike of the season. It was on the Appalachian Trail as a medical conference. This is also detailed in a separate blog post. I flew back to rendezvous with my dear friend Dr. Tate, and we did the conference/trail together, a 35-mile segment in central Virginia, passing by McAfee Gap as well as the Dragon’s Tooth. It was a delight being with Peter.

October and November went quickly. I was quite sore yet from the trail, mostly with neck pain. I went on a diet, avoiding most simple sugars, but the trail leaves you with an unavoidable raging hunger, and I quickly regained all the weight I lost hiking. It’s taken about 2 months to get over most of the soreness of the trail. I thought I was exceptional for having so much post-hike pain but realized in social media discussions that a prolonged recovery from the trail was quite typical. During the Appalachian Trail conference experience, I connected with Dr. Gehner with the intention of possibly engaging in a survey study of long-distance hikers to research what medical problems they might have experienced. I hope we can make this happen.

In December, Betsy and I mostly laid low. Betsy had a Collis-Nissen fundoplication (surgery) for severe reflux disease. It was completely successful, as Betsy has been able to go off of all of her medications and antacids. The surgery was intended to be a short 1.5-hour operation but ended up being much more difficult for the surgeon, taking about 4.5 hours. Fortunately, there were no complications and she was able to return home 2 days after surgery. Two weeks later, Betsy is returning to almost normal activity, though she is going very slow on her diet since a Collis modification of the procedure needed to be performed to lengthen her esophagus. Since I needed to stay home with Betsy, we spent much time watching the impeachment charade. At Christmas, we still don’t have a functioning oven (it gave out on Thanksgiving day) but will still be having family over both Christmas eve and Christmas day. We will be departing to Phoenix soon after Christmas to spend time with Rachel VanVoorst (daughter) and her family.

What about next year? 2020 will be problematic in that I don’t have any major projects to accomplish. There are several things that will keep me active. 1) I will be joining a community college band, playing the trumpet. 2) Betsy and I are going to start learning basic Spanish. We hope to walk the Camino de Santiago together either next fall or late spring 2021. We’ll be taking a conversational Spanish class at the local community college to facilitate that end. In conjunction, I am also reading through the Bible in Spanish, using the RVR 1960 version. 3a) I would like to do more of the PCT. Depending on snow conditions, I am thinking of going from Walker Pass to Old Station, which will connect several portions of this year’s hike as well as take me through the high Sierra. I have a reservation for the PCT in 2020, so need to just do it now. 3b) If I don’t hike much of the PCT, I’ll probably volunteer at Mt. Rainier National Park as a Trail Rover and provide assistance for folk while keeping them on the trails and off of the fragile environment. 4) I’d like to take several more grandchildren on overnight backpack trips. 5) Betsy and I are interested in some car camping trips in the Northwest, 6) possibly play trail angel with E.Z. at Hart’s Pass in early September. 7) Consideration for further bicycle tours? I’m not sure at this time, though doing the Pacific Coast route to San Diego would be fun. Perhaps a loop in Washington State would also provide entertainment as well as a challenge. I’m hoping that Jon and I could do a short trip together. 8) There is a possibility of our son Jon making a major lifestyle change. Betsy and I wait with hopeful anticipation. If it occurs, we will be taking a week or two trip to Thailand for that. 9) My reading habit has dropped off a bit. I still have stacks of books to read. Most of the books are either historical or theological that cannot be read quickly. 10) Time with Betsy. Betsy remains as charming as ever and exploring ways that we can stay active together remain top of my list. She is no longer keen on backpacking, and long-distance cycling is equally out. Hiking the Camino de Santiago makes sense as there is no pressure for distance, there are many places to stop for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, the culture is awesome and food is great, we can sleep in a bed every night, and don’t need to carry much on our back. Plus, we get a certificate of completion at the end which grants us a special blessing from la Papá (for this pope, the article “la” is correct!!!!) and a reduction of our time in purgatory, which already is zero since purgatory is a fiction, though it makes for awesome novels.

January will be a re-starter for me. I will need to get back into strict exercise. Since coming home, I’ve gone to the gym, or ridden my bicycle on a virtual reality trainer in the garage, twice a week. That isn’t enough. I’ll need to visit Moscow, Idaho to bring the hike-a-thon adventure to a closure. I’d like to re-edit my autobiography, add to it and complete it, and then possibly get it printed. Betsy and I always enjoying things together, but much will be determined by how quickly she bounces back from surgery and feels like going on adventures. Only God knows what our year-end story in 2020 will be.

5 Comments »
Dec 20

The liberal Media Industrial Complex by Mark Dice ★★★★

OK, it’s another review of a book by Mark Dice. I’ve followed Mark since he was doing Bohemian Grove exposés and Illuminati discussions. Mark has been accused of being a conspiracy theorist, though some get off the hook regarding conspiracy “delusions” when they speak of vast right-wing conspiracies (eg, Hilarious Clinton). Certainly, the “conspiracies” that Mark discusses are true, though I doubt that they are run by a cabal of hyper-wealthy evil masterminds that sit in James Bond-style high tech caves plotting the destruction of the world as we know it. The “conspiracies better fit the Three Stooges antics or Peter Sellers out on a new detective mission.

In a way, one could identify the Media Industrial Complex (MIC) as yet another conspiracy, but that would further misuse the word “conspiracy”. It perhaps is better to say that the media is a mirror on the nature of all humankind, being evil to the core, desirous of control of fellow citizens, not compelled to exercise integrity when half-truths could better serve their purpose, and examining the world through deeply tinted rose-colored glasses.

Mark is quite successful and heavily referenced in showing the MIC as unduly biased and most sly in their intent to conceal their biases. The chapters of this book are short, detailing how the MIC controls our thinking through censorship of news and information that doesn’t fit the desired narratives, and that has distinctive agendas (anti-gun, anti-God, pro-abortion, pro-LGBTQ, enviro-apocalyptic) that through manipulation lead audiences into thinking that their viewpoints are the only existing viewpoints without contest. Mark spends several chapters discussing (not in these words) Trump-derangement syndrome, and the assault on God and family of the media. Finally, Mark does a superb job of detailing the assault on truth and the manipulation of the news and public square for information that social media is inflicting on a purposely uninformed public. Wikipedia, Google, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube all fall prey to the discerning knife of Dice’s exposé. Most scary is the final chapter (The Future…) where the possibility of news being created by AI programs that now already exist, which can reconstruct anybody’s voice to say what it will, or incorporate a person in video that never ever happened. This technology is not Dick Tracy-esque, but already exists.

So, why do I give this book only 4 stars since it is an excellent and well-researched text? One thing missing from the book is a better in-depth analysis of what is being seen with our eyes wide shut. Mark Dice needs to be not only a provocateur but also a pundit and sage. Perhaps time and maturity will accomplish that feat. Do I recommend this book? Absolutely and whole-heartedly. Stop right now and order your book. It’s worth a read.

Tagged with:
No Comments »
preload preload preload